Classic and Contemporary Buddhist Works

The Svātantrika-Prāsaṅgika Distinction - Contributors

What Difference Does a Difference Make?

William L. Ames is an independent scholar as well as a librarian at John F. Kennedy University in Orinda, California. His publications include translations of the first seven chapters of Bhāvaviveka’s Prajñāpradīpa, with more to follow.

José Ignacio Cabezón is the Fourteenth Dalai Lama Professor of Tibetan Buddhism and Cultural Studies in the Religious Studies Department of at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has translated mKhas grub rje’s sTong thun chen mo in A Dose of Emptiness (1992), he is the author of Buddhism and Language: A Study of Indo-Tibetan Scholasticism (1994), and he has authored many articles in the field of Madhyamaka studies.

Georges B. J. Dreyfus trained for fifteen years in Tibetan monasteries, where he received the highest honor, the title of the Geshe Lharampa. He is presently Professor of Religion at Williams College, and is the author of Recognizing Reality: Dharmakīrti’s Philosophy and Its Tibetan Interpretations (1997) and The Sound of Two Hands Clapping: The Education of a Tibetan Buddhist Monk (2002).

Malcolm David Eckel is NEH Distinguished Teaching Professor of the Humanities at Boston University. His publications include Jñānagarbha’s Commentary on the Distinction Between the Two Truths (1987) and To See the Buddha: A Philosopher’s Quest for the Meaning of Emptiness (1992). He is also the editor of India and The West: The Problem of Understanding and Selected Essays of J. L. Mehta.

C. W. Huntington, Jr. is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Hartwick College in Oneonta, NY. He is the author of The Emptiness of Emptiness: An Introduction to Early Indian Mādhyamika (1989) and a variety of articles on early Indian Madhyamaka.

Sara L. McClintock is a lecturer in the Department of Languages and Cultures of Asia at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She recently completed her doctoral dissertation at Harvard University, entitled Omniscience and the Rhetoric of Reason in the Tattvasaṃgraha and the Tattvasaṃgrahapañjikā (2002).

Helmut Tauscher is a research scholar at the Institute for South Asian, Tibetan and Buddhist Studies in the Department of Tibetan and Buddhist Studies at Vienna University. He is a life-member of the Drepung Loseling Library Society in Mundgod, Karnataka, India and since 1991 has been engaged in a research project entitled “Western Tibetan Manuscripts, 11–14 c.” He is the author of numerous articles and book-length works on Madhyamaka, including Die Lehre von den Zwei Wirklichkeiten in Tsoṅ kha pas Madhyamaka-Werken (1995) and an edition of Phya pa chos kyi seng ge’s dBu ma shar gsum gyi stong thun (1999).

Tom J. F. Tillemans is professor of Buddhist Studies at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland. His publications on Madhyamaka philosophy include numerous articles and a two-volume work entitled Materials for the Study of firyadeva, Dharmapāla and Candrakīrti (1990).

Chizuko Yoshimizu studied philosophy, Indology, Tibetology, and Buddhism in Tokyo and Vienna, and has been a research scholar and lecturer at several universities in Europe and Japan. In addition to various articles, she has published a book entitled Die Erkenntnislehre des PrāsaṅgikaMadhyamaka nach dem Tshig gsal stoṅ thun gyi tshad ma’i rnam bśad des ’Jam dbyaṅs bźad pa’i rdo rje (1996).