The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha - Selections

I. Loving-Kindness

1 (1) Loving-Kindness
Thus have I heard. On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Park. There the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus: “Bhikkhus!”
    “Venerable sir!” those bhikkhus replied. The Blessed One said this:
    “Bhikkhus, when the liberation of the mind by loving-kindness has been pursued, developed, and cultivated, made a vehicle and basis, carried out, consolidated, and properly undertaken, eight benefits are to be expected. What eight?
    (1) “One sleeps well; (2) one awakens happily; (3) one does not have bad dreams; (4) one is pleasing to human beings; (5) one is pleasing to spirits; (6) deities protect one; (7) fire, poison, and weapons do not injure one; and (8) if one does not penetrate further, one fares on to the brahmā world.
    “When, bhikkhus, the liberation of the mind by loving-kindness has been pursued, developed, and cultivated, made a vehicle and basis, carried out, consolidated, and properly undertaken, these eight benefits are to be expected.”

For one who, ever mindful, develops
measureless loving-kindness,
the fetters thin out as he sees
the destruction of the acquisitions. [151]

If, with a mind free from hate,
one arouses love toward just one being,
one thereby becomes good.
Compassionate in mind toward all beings,
the noble one generates abundant merit.

Those royal sages who conquered the earth
with its multitudes of beings
traveled around performing sacrifices:
the horse sacrifice, the person sacrifice,
sammāpāsavājapeyyaniraggaḷa.

All these are not worth a sixteenth part
of a well-developed loving mind,
just as the hosts of stars cannot match
a sixteenth part of the moon’s radiance.

One who does not kill or enjoin killing,
who does not conquer or enjoin conquest,
one who has loving-kindness toward all beings
harbors no enmity toward anyone.

2 (2) Wisdom
“Bhikkhus, there are these eight causes and conditions that lead to obtaining the wisdom fundamental to the spiritual life when it has not been obtained and to its increase, maturation, and fulfillment by development after it has been obtained. What eight?
    (1) “Here, a bhikkhu lives in dependence on the Teacher or on a certain fellow monk in the position of a teacher, toward whom he has set up a keen sense of moral shame and moral dread, affection and reverence. This is the first cause and condition that leads to obtaining the wisdom fundamental to the spiritual life when it has not been obtained and to its increase, maturation, and fulfillment by development after it has been obtained. [152]
    (2) “As he is living in dependence on the Teacher or on a certain fellow monk in the position of a teacher, toward whom he has set up a keen sense of moral shame and moral dread, affection and reverence, he approaches them from time to time and inquires: ‘How is this, bhante? What is the meaning of this?’ Those venerable ones then disclose to him what has not been disclosed, clear up what is obscure, and dispel his perplexity about numerous perplexing points. This is the second cause and condition that leads to obtaining the wisdom fundamental to the spiritual life.…
    (3) “Having heard that Dhamma, he resorts to two kinds of withdrawal: withdrawal in body and withdrawal in mind. This is the third cause and condition that leads to obtaining the wisdom fundamental to the spiritual life.…
    (4) “He is virtuous; he dwells restrained by the Pātimokkha, possessed of good conduct and resort, seeing danger in minute faults. Having undertaken the training rules, he trains in them. This is the fourth cause and condition that leads to obtaining the wisdom fundamental to the spiritual life.…
    (5) “He has learnt much, remembers what he has learnt, and accumulates what he has learnt. Those teachings that are good in the beginning, good in the middle, and good in the end, with the right meaning and phrasing, which proclaim the perfectly complete and pure spiritual life—such teachings as these he has learnt much of, retained in mind, recited verbally, mentally investigated, and penetrated well by view. This is the fifth cause and condition that leads to obtaining the wisdom fundamental to the spiritual life.… [153]
    (6) “He has aroused energy for abandoning unwholesome qualities and acquiring wholesome qualities; he is strong, firm in exertion, not casting off the duty of cultivating wholesome qualities. This is the sixth cause and condition that leads to obtaining the wisdom fundamental to the spiritual life.…
    (7) “In the midst of the Saṅgha, he does not engage in rambling and pointless talk. Either he himself speaks on the Dhamma, or he requests someone else to do so, or he adopts noble silence. This is the seventh cause and condition that leads to obtaining the wisdom fundamental to the spiritual life.…
    (8) “He dwells contemplating arising and vanishing in the five aggregates subject to clinging: ‘Such is form, such its origin, such its passing away; such is feeling … such is perception … such are volitional activities … such is consciousness, such its origin, such its passing away.’ This is the eighth cause and condition that leads to obtaining the wisdom fundamental to the spiritual life when it has not been obtained and to its increase, maturation, and fulfillment by development after it has been obtained.
    (1) “His fellow monks esteem him thus: ‘This venerable one lives in dependence on the Teacher or on a certain fellow monk in the position of a teacher, toward whom he has set up a keen sense of moral shame and moral dread, affection and reverence. This venerable one surely knows and sees.’ This quality leads to affection, respect, esteem, accord, and unity.
    (2) “‘As this venerable one is living in dependence on the Teacher or on a certain fellow monk in the position of a teacher … [154] … those venerable ones … dispel his perplexity about numerous perplexing points. This venerable one surely knows and sees.’ This quality, too, leads to affection, respect, esteem, accord, and unity.
    (3) “‘Having heard that Dhamma, this venerable one resorts to two kinds of withdrawal: withdrawal in body and withdrawal in mind. This venerable one surely knows and sees.’ This quality, too, leads to affection, respect, esteem, accord, and unity.
    (4) “‘This venerable one is virtuous; he dwells restrained by the Pātimokkha … he trains in them. This venerable one surely knows and sees.’ This quality, too, leads to affection, respect, esteem, accord, and unity.
    (5) “‘This venerable one has learnt much … and penetrated well by view. This venerable one surely knows and sees.’ This quality, too, leads to affection, respect, esteem, accord, and unity.
    (6) “‘This venerable one has aroused energy for abandoning unwholesome qualities … not casting off the duty of cultivating wholesome qualities. This venerable one surely knows and sees.’ This quality, too, leads to affection, respect, esteem, accord, and unity. [155]
    (7) “‘In the midst of the Saṅgha, this venerable one does not engage in rambling and pointless talk … or he adopts noble silence. This venerable one surely knows and sees.’ This quality, too, leads to affection, respect, esteem, accord, and unity.
    (8) “‘This venerable one dwells contemplating arising and vanishing in the five aggregates subject to clinging.… This venerable one surely knows and sees.’ This quality, too, leads to affection, respect, esteem, accord, and unity.
    “These, bhikkhus, are the eight causes and conditions that lead to obtaining the wisdom fundamental to the spiritual life when it has not been obtained and to its increase, maturation, and fulfillment by development after it has been obtained.”

3 (3) Pleasing (1)
“Bhikkhus, possessing eight qualities, a bhikkhu is displeasing and disagreeable to his fellow monks and is neither respected nor esteemed by them. What eight? Here, (1) a bhikkhu praises those who are displeasing and (2) criticizes those who are pleasing; (3) he is desirous of gains and (4) honor; (5) he is morally shameless and (6) morally reckless; (7) he has evil desires and (8) holds wrong view. Possessing these eight qualities, a bhikkhu is displeasing and disagreeable to his fellow monks and is neither respected nor esteemed by them.
    “Bhikkhus, possessing eight qualities, a bhikkhu is pleasing and agreeable to his fellow monks and is respected and esteemed by them. What eight? [156] Here, (1) a bhikkhu does not praise those who are displeasing or (2) criticize those who are pleasing; (3) he is not desirous of gains or (4) honor; (5) he has a sense of moral shame and (6) moral dread; (7) he has few desires and (8) holds right view. Possessing these eight qualities, a bhikkhu is pleasing and agreeable to his fellow monks and is respected and esteemed by them.”

4 (4) Pleasing (2) 
    “Bhikkhus, possessing eight qualities, a bhikkhu is displeasing and disagreeable to his fellow monks and is neither respected nor esteemed by them. What eight? Here, a bhikkhu is (1) desirous of gains, (2) honor, and (3) reputation; (4) he does not know the proper time and (5) does not know moderation; (6) he is impure; (7) he speaks much; and (8) he insults and reviles his fellow monks. Possessing these eight qualities, a bhikkhu is displeasing and disagreeable to his fellow monks and is neither respected nor esteemed by them.
    “Bhikkhus, possessing eight qualities, a bhikkhu is pleasing and agreeable to his fellow monks and is respected and esteemed by them. What eight? Here, a bhikkhu is (1) not desirous of gains, (2) honor, and (3) reputation; (4) he is one who knows the proper time and (5) who knows moderation; (6) he is pure; (7) he does not speak much; and (8) he does not insult and revile his fellow monks. Possessing these eight qualities, a bhikkhu is pleasing and agreeable to his fellow monks and is respected and esteemed by them.”

5 (5) World (1) 
    “Bhikkhus, these eight worldly conditions revolve around the world, and the world revolves around these eight worldly conditions. What eight? [157] Gain and loss, disrepute and fame, blame and praise, and pleasure and pain. These eight worldly conditions revolve around the world, and the world revolves around these eight worldly conditions.”

Gain and loss, disrepute and fame,
blame and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions that people meet
are impermanent, transient, and subject to change.

A wise and mindful person knows them
and sees that they are subject to change.
Desirable conditions don’t excite his mind
nor is he repelled by undesirable conditions.

He has dispelled attraction and repulsion;
they are gone and no longer present.
Having known the dustless, sorrowless state,
he understands rightly and has transcended existence.

6 (6) World (2)
“Bhikkhus, these eight worldly conditions revolve around the world, and the world revolves around these eight worldly conditions. What eight? Gain and loss, disrepute and fame, blame and praise, and pleasure and pain. These eight worldly conditions revolve around the world, and the world revolves around these eight worldly conditions.
   “Bhikkhus, an uninstructed worldling meets gain and loss, disrepute and fame, blame and praise, and pleasure and pain. An instructed noble disciple also meets gain and loss, disrepute and fame, blame and praise, and pleasure and pain. What [158] is the distinction, the disparity, the difference between an instructed noble disciple and an uninstructed worldling with regard to this?”
   “Bhante, our teachings are rooted in the Blessed One, guided by the Blessed One, take recourse in the Blessed One. It would be good if the Blessed One would clear up the meaning of this statement. Having heard it from him, the bhikkhus will retain it in mind.”
    “Then listen, bhikkhus, and attend closely. I will speak.”
   “Yes, bhante,” those bhikkhus replied. The Blessed One said this:
   “(1) Bhikkhus, when an uninstructed worldling meets with gain, he does not reflect thus: This gain that I have met is impermanent, suffering, and subject to change.’ He does not understand it as it really is. (2) When he meets with loss … (3) … fame … (4) … disrepute … (5) … blame … (6) … praise … (7) … pleasure … (8) … pain, he does not reflect thus: This pain that I have met is impermanent, suffering, and subject to change.’ He does not understand it as it really is.
   “Gain obsesses his mind, and loss obsesses his mind. Fame obsesses his mind, and disrepute obsesses his mind. Blame obsesses his mind, and praise obsesses his mind. Pleasure obsesses his mind, and pain obsesses his mind. He is attracted to gain and repelled by loss. He is attracted to fame and repelled by disrepute. He is attracted to praise and repelled by blame. He is attracted to pleasure and repelled by pain. Thus involved with attraction and repulsion, he is not freed from birth, from old age and death, from sorrow, lamentation, pain, dejection, and anguish; he is not freed from suffering, I say.
   “But, bhikkhus, (1) when an instructed noble disciple meets with gain, he reflects thus: This gain that I have met is impermanent, suffering, and subject to change.’ He thus understands it as it really is. (2) When he meets with loss … (3) … fame … (4) … [159] disrepute … (5) … blame … (6) … praise … (7) … pleasure … (8) … pain, he reflects thus: This pain that I have met is impermanent, suffering, and subject to change.’ He thus understands it as it really is.
   “Gain does not obsess his mind, and loss does not obsess his mind. Fame does not obsess his mind, and disrepute does not obsess his mind. Blame does not obsess his mind, and praise does not obsess his mind. Pleasure does not obsess his mind, and pain does not obsess his mind. He is not attracted to gain or repelled by loss. He is not attracted to fame or repelled by disrepute. He is not attracted to praise or repelled by blame. He is not attracted to pleasure or repelled by pain. Having thus discarded attraction and repulsion, he is freed from birth, from old age and death, from sorrow, lamentation, pain, dejection, and anguish; he is freed from suffering, I say.
   “This, bhikkhus, is the distinction, the disparity, the difference between an instructed noble disciple and an uninstructed worldling.”
   [The verses are identical with those of 8:5.] [160]

7 (7) Devadatta’s Failing
On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Rājagaha on Mount Vulture Peak not long after Devadatta had left. There the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus with reference to Devadatta:
   “Bhikkhus, it is good for a bhikkhu from time to time to review his own failings. It is good for him from time to time to review the failings of others. It is good for him from time to time to review his own achievements. It is good for him from time to time to review the achievements of others. Because he was overcome and obsessed by eight bad conditions, Devadatta is bound for the plane of misery, bound for hell, and he will remain there for an eon, unredeemable. What eight?
   “(1) Because he was overcome and obsessed by gain, Devadatta is bound for the plane of misery, bound for hell, and he will remain there for an eon, unredeemable. (2) Because he was overcome and obsessed by loss … (3) … by fame … (4) … by disrepute … (5) … by honor … (6) … by lack of honor … (7) … by evil desires … (8) … by bad friendship, Devadatta is bound for the plane of misery, bound for hell, and he will remain there for an eon, unredeemable. Because he was overcome and obsessed by these eight bad conditions, Devadatta is bound for the plane of misery, bound for hell, and he will remain there for an eon, unredeemable.
   “It is good for a bhikkhu to overcome gain whenever it arises. It is good for him to overcome loss whenever it arises… to overcome fame … disrepute … honor [161] … lack of honor … evil desires … bad friendship whenever it arises.
   “And for what reason should a bhikkhu overcome gain whenever it arises? For what reason should he overcome loss … fame … disrepute … honor … lack of honor … evil desires … bad friendship whenever it arises? Those taints, distressful and feverish, that might arise in one who has not overcome arisen gain do not occur in one who has overcome it. Those taints, distressful and feverish, that might arise in one who has not overcome arisen loss … arisen fame … arisen disrepute … arisen honor … arisen lack of honor … arisen evil desires … arisen bad friendship do not occur in one who has overcome it. For this reason a bhikkhu should overcome gain whenever it arises. He should overcome loss … fame … disrepute … honor … lack of honor … evil desires … bad friendship whenever it arises.
    “Therefore, bhikkhus, you should train yourselves thus: ‘We will overcome gain whenever it arises. We will overcome loss … fame … disrepute … honor … lack of honor … evil desires … bad friendship whenever it arises.’ It is in such a way that you should train yourselves.” [162]

8 (8) Uttara on Failing
On one occasion the Venerable Uttara was dwelling at Mahisavatthu, in Dhavajālikā on Mount Saṅkheyya. There the Venerable Uttara addressed the bhikkhus.…
   “Friends, it is good for a bhikkhu from time to time to review his own failings. It is good for a bhikkhu from time to time to review the failings of others. It is good for a bhikkhu from time to time to review his own achievements. It is good for a bhikkhu from time to time to review the achievements of others.”
    Now on that occasion the great [deva] king Vessavaṇa was traveling from north to south on some business. He heard the Venerable Uttara at Mahisavatthu, in Dhavajālikā on Mount Saṅkheyya, teaching the Dhamma to the bhikkhus thus: ‘Friends, it is good for a bhikkhu from time to time to review his own failings … the failings of others … his own achievements … the achievements of others.’ Then, just as a strong man might extend his drawn-in arm or draw in his extended arm, Vessavaṇa disappeared from Mount Saṅkheyya and reappeared among the Tāvatiṃsa devas.
   He approached Sakka, ruler of the devas, and said to him: “Respected sir, you should know that the Venerable Uttara, at Mahisavatthu, [163] in Dhavajālikā on Mount Saṅkheyya, has been teaching the Dhamma to the bhikkhus thus: ‘Friends, it is good for a bhikkhu from time to time to review his own failings … the failings of others … his own achievements … the achievements of others.’”
   Then, just as a strong man might extend his drawn-in arm or draw in his extended arm, Sakka disappeared from among the Tāvatiṃsa devas and reappeared at Mahisavatthu, in Dhavajālikā on Mount Saṅkheyya, in front of the Venerable Uttara. He approached the Venerable Uttara, paid homage to him, stood to one side, and said to him:
   “Is it true, bhante, as is said, that you have been teaching the Dhamma to the bhikkhus thus: ‘Friends, it is good for a bhikkhu from time to time to review his own failings … the failings of others … his own achievements … the achievements of others’?”
   “Yes, ruler of the devas.”
   “But, bhante, was this your own discernment, or was it the word of the Blessed One, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One?”
   “Well then, ruler of the devas, I will give you a simile; even by means of a simile, some intelligent people understand the meaning of what has been said. Suppose not far from a village or town there was a great heap of grain, and a large crowd of people were to take away grain with carrying-poles, baskets, hip-sacks, [164] and their cupped hands. If someone were to approach that large crowd of people and ask them: ‘Where did you get this grain?’ what should they say?”
   “Bhante, those people should say: ‘We got it from that great heap of grain.’”
   “So too, ruler of the devas, whatever is well spoken is all the word of the Blessed One, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One. We ourselves and others speak by drawing upon that.”
   “It’s astounding and amazing, bhante, how well you stated this: ‘Whatever is well spoken is all the word of the Blessed One, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One. I myself and others derive our good words from him.’
   “On one occasion, Bhante Uttara, the Blessed One was dwelling at Rājagaha, on Mount Vulture Peak, not long after Devadatta had left. There the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus with reference to Devadatta: ‘Bhikkhus, it is good for a bhikkhu from time to time to review his own failings … [Sakka here cites the Buddha’s entire discourse of 8:7, down to:] [165, 166] … It is in such a way, bhikkhus, that you should train yourselves.’
   “Bhante Uttara, this exposition of the Dhamma has not been promulgated anywhere among the four human assemblies: that is, among bhikkhus, bhikkhunīs, male lay followers, and female lay followers. Bhante, learn this exposition of the Dhamma, master this exposition of the Dhamma, and retain this exposition of the Dhamma in mind. This exposition of the Dhamma is beneficial; it pertains to the fundamentals of the spiritual life.”

9 (9) Nanda
   “Bhikkhus, (1) one speaking rightly would say of Nanda that he is a clansman; (2) that he is strong; (3) that he is graceful; and (4) that he is strongly prone to lust.” How else could Nanda lead the complete and pure spiritual life unless (5) he guarded the doors of the sense faculties, (6) observed moderation in eating, (7) was intent on wakefulness, and (8) possessed mindfulness and clear comprehension?
   “Bhikkhus, this is how Nanda guards the doors of the sense faculties: [167] If he needs to look to the east, he does so after he has fully considered the matter and clearly comprehends it thus: ‘When I look to the east, bad unwholesome states of longing and dejection will not flow in upon me.’ If he needs to look to the west … to the north … to the south … to look up … to look down … to survey the intermediate directions, he does so after he has fully considered the matter and clearly comprehends it thus: ‘When I look to the intermediate directions, bad unwholesome states of longing and dejection will not flow in upon me.’ That is how Nanda guards the doors of the sense faculties.
   “This is how Nanda observes moderation in eating: Here, reflecting carefully, Nanda consumes food neither for amusement nor for intoxication nor for the sake of physical beauty and attractiveness, but only for the support and maintenance of this body, for avoiding harm, and for assisting the spiritual life, considering: Thus I shall terminate the old feeling and not arouse a new feeling, and I shall be healthy and blameless and dwell at ease.’ That is how Nanda observes moderation in eating.
   “This is how Nanda is intent on wakefulness: [168] During the day, while walking back and forth and sitting, Nanda purifies his mind of obstructive qualities. In the first watch of the night, while walking back and forth and sitting, he purifies his mind of obstructive qualities. In the middle watch of the night he lies down on the right side in the lion’s posture, with one foot overlapping the other, mindful and clearly comprehending, after noting in his mind the idea of rising. After rising, in the last watch of the night, while walking back and forth and sitting, he purifies his mind of obstructive qualities. That is how Nanda is intent on wakefulness.
   “This is Nanda’s mindfulness and clear comprehension: Nanda knows feelings as they arise, as they remain present, as they disappear; he knows perceptions as they arise, as they remain present, as they disappear; he knows thoughts as they arise, as they remain present, as they disappear. That is Nanda’s mindfulness and clear comprehension.
   “How else, bhikkhus, could Nanda lead the complete and pure spiritual life unless he guarded the doors of the sense faculties, observed moderation in eating, was intent on wakefulness, and possessed mindfulness and clear comprehension?”

10 (10) Trash
On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Campā on a bank of the Gaggārā Lotus Pond. Now on that occasion bhikkhus were reproving a bhikkhu for an offense. When being reproved, that bhikkhu answered evasively, diverted the discussion to an irrelevant subject, and displayed anger, hatred, and resentment. Then the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus: [169] “Bhikkhus, eject this person! Bhikkhus, eject this person! This person should be banished. Why should another’s son vex you?”
   “Here, bhikkhus, so long as the bhikkhus do not see his offense, a certain person has the same manner (1) of going forward and (2) returning, (3) of looking ahead and (4) looking aside, (5) of bending and (6) stretching his limbs, and (7) of wearing his robes and (8) carrying his outer robe and bowl as the good bhikkhus. When, however, they see his offense, they know him as a corruption among ascetics, just chaff and trash among ascetics. Then they expel him. For what reason? So that he doesn’t corrupt the good bhikkhus.
   “Suppose that when a field of barley is growing, some blighted barley would appear that would be just chaff and trash among the barley. As long as its head has not come forth, its roots would be just like those of the other [crops], the good barley; its stem would be just like that of the other [crops], the good barley; its leaves would be just like those of the other [crops], the good barley. When, however, its head comes forth, they know it as blighted barley, just chaff [170] and trash among the barley. Then they pull it up by the root and cast it out from the barley field. For what reason? So that it doesn’t spoil the good barley.’
   “So too, so long as the bhikkhus do not see his offense, a certain person here has the same manner of going forward … and carrying his outer robe and bowl as the good bhikkhus. When, however, they see his offense, they know him as a corruption among ascetics, just chaff and trash among ascetics. Then they expel him. For what reason? So that he doesn’t corrupt the good bhikkhus.
   “Suppose that when a large heap of grain is being winnowed, the grains that are firm and pithy form a pile on one side, and the wind blows the spoiled grains and chaff to another side. Then the owners take a broom and sweep them even further away. For what reason? So that they don’t spoil the good grain.
   “So too, so long as the bhikkhus do not see his offense, a certain person here has the same manner of going forward … and carrying his outer robe and bowl as the others, the good bhikkhus. When, however, the bhikkhus see his offense, they know him as [171] a corruption among ascetics, just chaff and trash among ascetics. Then they expel him. For what reason? So that he doesn’t corrupt the good bhikkhus.
   “Suppose a man needs a gutter for a well. He would take a sharp axe and enter the woods. He would strike a number of trees with the blade of his axe. When so struck, the firm and pithy trees would give off a dull sound, but those that are inwardly rotten, corrupt and decayed would give off a hollow sound. The man would cut this tree down at its foot, cut off the crown, thoroughly clean it out, and use it as a gutter for a well.
   “So too, bhikkhus, so long as the bhikkhus do not see his offense, a certain person here has the same manner of going forward and returning, of looking ahead and looking aside, of bending and stretching his limbs, of wearing his robes and carrying his outer robe and bowl, as the good bhikkhus. When, however, the bhikkhus see his offense, they know him as corruption among ascetics, just chaff and trash among ascetics. Then they expel him. For what reason? So that he doesn’t corrupt the good bhikkhus.” [172]

By living together with him, know him as
an angry person with evil desires;
a denigrator, obstinate, and insolent,
envious, miserly, and deceptive.
   He speaks to people just like an ascetic,
[addressing them] with a calm voice;
but secretly he does evil deeds,
holds pernicious views, and lacks respect.

Though he is devious, a speaker of lies,
you should know him as he truly is;
then you should all meet in harmony
and firmly drive him away.

Get rid of the trash!
Remove the depraved fellows!
Sweep the chaff away, non-ascetics
who think themselves ascetics!

Having banished those of evil desires,
of bad conduct and resort,
dwell in communion, ever mindful,
the pure with the pure;
then, in harmony, alert,
you will make an end of suffering.
 

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© Bhikkhu Bodhi, The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha (Wisdom Publications, 2012)

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