Living Zen, Loving God - Praise

Living Zen, Loving God offers a provocative notion of how the Zen experience can bring one a deeper understanding of the basic Christian tenets. Habito’s wise insight finds a surprisingly high amount of common ground between these seemingly parallel faiths… Living Zen, Loving God clearly highlights the universality of the basic human problems and serene solutions addressed in the founding texts of both Christianity and Buddhism. It’s a brilliant meditation that brings new depth and scope to the study of religion.”—New York Resident

“Ruben Habito’s Living Zen, Loving God is a pioneering example of what I call interspirituality: the exploration experientially of another tradition while remaining committed to one’s home tradition. Finding the common ground between Christianity and Zen in contemplative practice, he also discovered what so many others have: plunging into the depth of another tradition sheds fresh light on one’s faith in the home tradition, and does so in a positive way, consonant with one’s faith. This is a very valuable book.”—Brother Wayne Teasdale, author of The Mystic Heart: Discovering a Universal Spirituality in the World’s Religions

“Christians who practice meditation and especially Zen-curious Christians should not miss this book. Habito’s reading of the Enlightened Samaritan story alone is worth the price of admission.”—The Rev. Deacon Kenneth Arnold, author of Nightfishing in Jerusalem

“With a deft hand Living Zen, Loving God guides us to Buddha’s compassionate wisdom and to Christ’s love. Completely Christian and completely Zen, Habito is one of the great and true teachers for our age.”—Rev. James Ishmael Ford, author of In This Very Moment

“This is theology as it should be: thoughtful, intelligent reflections arising directly out of lived religion and pointing us toward wise and loving engagement with our world.”—Kim Boykin, author of Zen for Christians

“My reading of Zen as presented by Ruben L.F. Habito in Living Zen, Loving God is that its practice can dispose one for that ripe emptiness wherein the Holy Spirit prompts. Did not Jesus himself bring his human senses and body into harmony with the guiding Breath in being fully present to the will of the Father? This book will give you pause to ponder.”—Brother Aaron Raverty, O.S.B., Ph.D., Bulletin of Monastic Interreligious Dialogue / St. John’s Abbey, Minnesota

“No one is more qualified than Ruben Habito to write this book. For Christians curious about Zen, and Zen Buddhists curious about Christianity, this is the place to start. Each chapter is full of insights into the relationship between the two spirituals paths.”—David R. Loy, author of The Great Awakening

“Ruben Habito is an extraordinary human bridge over troubled waters, connecting many realms as an astute academic scholar; an authentic Zen teacher and practitioner; a devoted Christian, formerly a Jesuit priest; and an effective, committed social activist. Ruben’s clear Zen presence allows him to search for God while driving, washing dishes, or shopping for groceries. In this gift of Living Zen, Loving God, he speaks from deep inner experience to illuminate both traditions for us.”—Taigen Dan Leighton, author of Faces of Compassion: Classic Bodhisattva Archetypes and Their Modern Expression.

“Ruben Habito’s Living Zen, Loving God is an original, creative contribution to contemporary religious self-understanding. Coming from someone who lives and practices in the Zen Buddhist and Christian worlds, his thought not only traverses the world of two religions but reflects the synergy of an accomplished life that is free from dogmatism and draws on multiple sources and experiences to meld a vision for tackling the religious, ecological, and social issues of a world in deep crisis. This work provides inspiration for anyone seeking a spiritual path in global perspective.”—Professor Mark Unno, advisor to the Journal of Buddhist-Christian Studies and author of Shingon Refractions

“Habito is a prominent figure in the Buddhist-Christian dialogue. In this erudite collection of essays, Habito described his experience of living Zen and loving God as one of ‘mutual indwelling.’ In once chapter he salutes the practice of emptiness; he also explains the meaning and significance of the Heart Sutra, the four vows of the Bodhisattvam and several Zen koans. In another wonderful chapter, Habito offers a Zen reading of the parable of the Good Samaritan. Zen practice, according to Habito, does not lead to an abandonment of the world but to a deeper engagement.”—Spirtuality and Health

“At a time when one hears all too often of the irreconcilable differences between religions, it is a relief and a delight to read the words of someone who has gleaned much from Christianity and from Zen Buddhism. [Habito] takes Christian doctrine and infuses it with the deepest insights of Zen Buddhist experience. He goes a long way toward establishing a dialogue between faiths that have not always understood each other.”—Philosophy East and West (University of Hawai’i)