The Karmapas and Their Mahamudra Forefathers - Praise

An Illustrated Guide

With lively, engaging stories and exquisite portraits, this volume is sure to inspire all practitioners of Tibetan Buddhism.

 

Paperback

344 pages, 6.5 x 7.5 inches

$34.95

ISBN 9781614292807

Add to Cart »

eBook

eBook Bundle (PDF, epub, mobi)

$19.99

ISBN 9781614293040

Add to Cart »

“A perfect pairing, these biographies and images enliven Kagyu history, shining light on mnay of the traditions most important figures.” —Buddhadharma

“This collection of inspiring stories and beautiful artwork presents a glimpse into the lives of some of the greatest masters of the Kagyu lineage. These stories have been passed down from teacher to student for centuries. Filled with profound teachings and practical guidance on the path of awakening, this volume will be of great interest to all those who wish to embody compassion and wisdom.” —Mingyur Rinpoche, author of The Joy of Living

“A wonderful introduction to the history of the Karmapas, one of the most important and influential lines of reincarnated lamas in all of Tibetan history, and at the same time, a wonderful introduction to one of the most beautiful painting styles in Tibetan art. This is a laudable achievement, and a sure sign of the ongoing vitality of these traditions today. A marvelous book to enjoy, and from which to learn.” —Janet Gyatso, Harvard University

The Karmapas and Their Mahamudra Forefathers unites Khenpo Sherap Phüntsok's traditional Tibetan biographies, Michele Martin’s artful English translations, and Lama Rigzin’s exquisite painted portraits to form an extraordinary record of Buddhism’s transmission from India to Tibet and then into exile. This collection is a welcome addition for anyone interested in the history of the Karma Kagyu school of Tibetan Buddhism, its renowned lineage of teachers known as the Karmapas, and their seminal meditation instructions called Mahamudra. The book brings to life great masters of the past and illuminates their contributions to a vibrant living tradition.” —Andrew Quintman, Yale University